Raskolnikov saw clearly that this was a man with a firm purpose in his mind and able to keep it to himself. "I expect you've not talked to any one for some days?" he asked. "Scarcely any one. I suppose you are wondering at my being such an adaptable man?" "No, I am only wondering at your being too adaptable a man." "Because I am not offended at the rudeness of your questions? Is that it? But why take offence? As you asked, so I answered," he replied, with a surprising expression of simplicity. "You know, there's hardly anything I take interest in," he went on, as it were dreamily, "especially now, I've nothing to do.... You are quite at liberty to imagine though that I am making up to you with a motive, particularly as I told you I want to see your sister about something. But I'll confess frankly, I am very much bored. The last three days especially, so I am delighted to see you.... Don't be angry, Rodion Romanovitch, but you seem to be somehow awfully strange yourself. Say what you like, there's something wrong with you, and now, too... not this very minute, I mean, but now, generally.... Well, well, I won't, I won't, don't scowl! I am not such a bear, you know, as you think." Raskolnikov looked gloomily at him. "You are not a bear, perhaps, at all," he said. "I fancy indeed that you are a man of very good breeding, or at least know how on occasion to behave like one." "I am not particularly interested in any one's opinion," Svidrigailov answered, dryly and even with a shade of haughtiness, "and therefore why not be vulgar at times when vulgarity is such a convenient cloak for our climate... and especially if one has a natural propensity that way," he added, laughing again. "But I've heard you have many friends here. You are, as they say, 'not without connections.' What can you want with me, then, unless you've some special object?" "That's true that I have friends here," Svidrigailov admitted, not replying to the chief point. "I've met some already. I've been lounging about for the last three days, and I've seen them, or they've seen me. That's a matter of course. I am well dressed and reckoned not a poor man; the emancipation of the serfs hasn't affected me; my property consists chiefly of forests and water meadows. The revenue has not fallen off; but... I am not going to see them, I was sick of them long ago. I've been here three days and have called on no one.... What a town it is! How has it come into existence among us, tell me that? A town of officials and students of all sorts. Yes, there's a great deal I didn't notice when I was here eight years ago, kicking up my heels.... My only hope now is in anatomy, by Jove, it is!" "Anatomy?" "But as for these clubs, Dussauts, parades, or progress, indeed, may be- well, all that can go on without me," he went on, again without noticing the question. "Besides, who wants to be a card-sharper?" "Why, have you been a card-sharper then?" "How could I help being? There was a regular set of us, men of the best society, eight years ago; we had a fine time. And all men of

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Raskolnikov saw clearly that this was a man with a firm purpose in his mind and able to keep it to himself. "I expect you've not talked to any one for some days?" he asked. "Scarcely any one. I suppose you are wondering at my being such an adaptable man?" "No, I am only wondering at your being too adaptable a man." "Because I am not offended at the rudeness of your questions? Is that it? But why take offence? As you asked, so I answered," he replied, with a surprising expression of simplicity. "You know, there's hardly anything I take interest in," he went on, as it were dreamily, "especially now, I've nothing to do.... You are quite at liberty to imagine though that I am making up to you with a motive, particularly as I told you I want to see your sister about something. But I'll confess frankly, I am very much bored. The last three days especially, so I am delighted to see you.... Don't be angry, Rodion Romanovitch, but you seem to be somehow awfully strange yourself. Say what you like, there's something wrong with you, and now, too... not this very minute, I mean, but now, generally.... Well, well, I won't, I won't, don't scowl! I am not such a bear, you know, as you think." Raskolnikov looked gloomily at him. "You are not a bear, perhaps, at all," he said. "I fancy indeed that you are a man of very good breeding, or at least know how on occasion to behave like one." "I am not particularly interested in any one's opinion," Svidrigailov answered, dryly and even with a shade of haughtiness, "and therefore why not be vulgar at times when vulgarity is such a convenient cloak for our climate... and especially if one has a natural propensity that way," he added, laughing again. "But I've heard you have many friends here. You are, as they say, 'not without connections.' What can you want with me, then, unless you've some special object?" "That's true that I have friends here," Svidrigailov admitted, not replying to the chief point. "I've met some already. I've been lounging about for the last three days, and I've seen them, or they've seen me. That's a matter of course. I am well dressed and reckoned not a poor man; the emancipation of the serfs hasn't affected me; my property consists chiefly of forests and water meadows. The revenue has not fallen off; but... I am not going to see them, I was sick of them long ago. I've been here three days and have called on no one.... What a town it is! How has it come into existence among us, tell me that? A town of officials and students of all sorts. Yes, there's a great deal I didn't notice when I was here eight years ago, kicking up my heels.... My only hope now is in anatomy, by Jove, it is!" "Anatomy?" "But as for these clubs, Dussauts, parades, or progress, indeed, may be- well, all that can go on without me," he went on, again without noticing the question. "Besides, who wants to be a card-sharper?" "Why, have you been a card-sharper then?" "How could I help being? There was a regular set of us, men of the best society, eight years ago; we had a fine time. And all men of,bob综合体育官网登录Raskolnikov saw clearly that this was a man with a firm purpose in his mind and able to keep it to himself. "I expect you've not talked to any one for some days?" he asked. "Scarcely any one. I suppose you are wondering at my being such an adaptable man?" "No, I am only wondering at your being too adaptable a man." "Because I am not offended at the rudeness of your questions? Is that it? But why take offence? As you asked, so I answered," he replied, with a surprising expression of simplicity. "You know, there's hardly anything I take interest in," he went on, as it were dreamily, "especially now, I've nothing to do.... You are quite at liberty to imagine though that I am making up to you with a motive, particularly as I told you I want to see your sister about something. But I'll confess frankly, I am very much bored. The last three days especially, so I am delighted to see you.... Don't be angry, Rodion Romanovitch, but you seem to be somehow awfully strange yourself. Say what you like, there's something wrong with you, and now, too... not this very minute, I mean, but now, generally.... Well, well, I won't, I won't, don't scowl! I am not such a bear, you know, as you think." Raskolnikov looked gloomily at him. "You are not a bear, perhaps, at all," he said. "I fancy indeed that you are a man of very good breeding, or at least know how on occasion to behave like one." "I am not particularly interested in any one's opinion," Svidrigailov answered, dryly and even with a shade of haughtiness, "and therefore why not be vulgar at times when vulgarity is such a convenient cloak for our climate... and especially if one has a natural propensity that way," he added, laughing again. "But I've heard you have many friends here. You are, as they say, 'not without connections.' What can you want with me, then, unless you've some special object?" "That's true that I have friends here," Svidrigailov admitted, not replying to the chief point. "I've met some already. I've been lounging about for the last three days, and I've seen them, or they've seen me. That's a matter of course. I am well dressed and reckoned not a poor man; the emancipation of the serfs hasn't affected me; my property consists chiefly of forests and water meadows. The revenue has not fallen off; but... I am not going to see them, I was sick of them long ago. I've been here three days and have called on no one.... What a town it is! How has it come into existence among us, tell me that? A town of officials and students of all sorts. Yes, there's a great deal I didn't notice when I was here eight years ago, kicking up my heels.... My only hope now is in anatomy, by Jove, it is!" "Anatomy?" "But as for these clubs, Dussauts, parades, or progress, indeed, may be- well, all that can go on without me," he went on, again without noticing the question. "Besides, who wants to be a card-sharper?" "Why, have you been a card-sharper then?" "How could I help being? There was a regular set of us, men of the best society, eight years ago; we had a fine time. And all men ofRaskolnikov saw clearly that this was a man with a firm purpose in his mind and able to keep it to himself. "I expect you've not talked to any one for some days?" he asked. "Scarcely any one. I suppose you are wondering at my being such an adaptable man?" "No, I am only wondering at your being too adaptable a man." "Because I am not offended at the rudeness of your questions? Is that it? But why take offence? As you asked, so I answered," he replied, with a surprising expression of simplicity. "You know, there's hardly anything I take interest in," he went on, as it were dreamily, "especially now, I've nothing to do.... You are quite at liberty to imagine though that I am making up to you with a motive, particularly as I told you I want to see your sister about something. But I'll confess frankly, I am very much bored. The last three days especially, so I am delighted to see you.... Don't be angry, Rodion Romanovitch, but you seem to be somehow awfully strange yourself. Say what you like, there's something wrong with you, and now, too... not this very minute, I mean, but now, generally.... Well, well, I won't, I won't, don't scowl! I am not such a bear, you know, as you think." Raskolnikov looked gloomily at him. "You are not a bear, perhaps, at all," he said. "I fancy indeed that you are a man of very good breeding, or at least know how on occasion to behave like one." "I am not particularly interested in any one's opinion," Svidrigailov answered, dryly and even with a shade of haughtiness, "and therefore why not be vulgar at times when vulgarity is such a convenient cloak for our climate... and especially if one has a natural propensity that way," he added, laughing again. "But I've heard you have many friends here. You are, as they say, 'not without connections.' What can you want with me, then, unless you've some special object?" "That's true that I have friends here," Svidrigailov admitted, not replying to the chief point. "I've met some already. I've been lounging about for the last three days, and I've seen them, or they've seen me. That's a matter of course. I am well dressed and reckoned not a poor man; the emancipation of the serfs hasn't affected me; my property consists chiefly of forests and water meadows. The revenue has not fallen off; but... I am not going to see them, I was sick of them long ago. I've been here three days and have called on no one.... What a town it is! How has it come into existence among us, tell me that? A town of officials and students of all sorts. Yes, there's a great deal I didn't notice when I was here eight years ago, kicking up my heels.... My only hope now is in anatomy, by Jove, it is!" "Anatomy?" "But as for these clubs, Dussauts, parades, or progress, indeed, may be- well, all that can go on without me," he went on, again without noticing the question. "Besides, who wants to be a card-sharper?" "Why, have you been a card-sharper then?" "How could I help being? There was a regular set of us, men of the best society, eight years ago; we had a fine time. And all men of,Raskolnikov saw clearly that this was a man with a firm purpose in his mind and able to keep it to himself. "I expect you've not talked to any one for some days?" he asked. "Scarcely any one. I suppose you are wondering at my being such an adaptable man?" "No, I am only wondering at your being too adaptable a man." "Because I am not offended at the rudeness of your questions? Is that it? But why take offence? As you asked, so I answered," he replied, with a surprising expression of simplicity. "You know, there's hardly anything I take interest in," he went on, as it were dreamily, "especially now, I've nothing to do.... You are quite at liberty to imagine though that I am making up to you with a motive, particularly as I told you I want to see your sister about something. But I'll confess frankly, I am very much bored. The last three days especially, so I am delighted to see you.... Don't be angry, Rodion Romanovitch, but you seem to be somehow awfully strange yourself. Say what you like, there's something wrong with you, and now, too... not this very minute, I mean, but now, generally.... Well, well, I won't, I won't, don't scowl! I am not such a bear, you know, as you think." Raskolnikov looked gloomily at him. "You are not a bear, perhaps, at all," he said. "I fancy indeed that you are a man of very good breeding, or at least know how on occasion to behave like one." "I am not particularly interested in any one's opinion," Svidrigailov answered, dryly and even with a shade of haughtiness, "and therefore why not be vulgar at times when vulgarity is such a convenient cloak for our climate... and especially if one has a natural propensity that way," he added, laughing again. "But I've heard you have many friends here. You are, as they say, 'not without connections.' What can you want with me, then, unless you've some special object?" "That's true that I have friends here," Svidrigailov admitted, not replying to the chief point. "I've met some already. I've been lounging about for the last three days, and I've seen them, or they've seen me. That's a matter of course. I am well dressed and reckoned not a poor man; the emancipation of the serfs hasn't affected me; my property consists chiefly of forests and water meadows. The revenue has not fallen off; but... I am not going to see them, I was sick of them long ago. I've been here three days and have called on no one.... What a town it is! How has it come into existence among us, tell me that? A town of officials and students of all sorts. Yes, there's a great deal I didn't notice when I was here eight years ago, kicking up my heels.... My only hope now is in anatomy, by Jove, it is!" "Anatomy?" "But as for these clubs, Dussauts, parades, or progress, indeed, may be- well, all that can go on without me," he went on, again without noticing the question. "Besides, who wants to be a card-sharper?" "Why, have you been a card-sharper then?" "How could I help being? There was a regular set of us, men of the best society, eight years ago; we had a fine time. And all men of,Raskolnikov saw clearly that this was a man with a firm purpose in his mind and able to keep it to himself. "I expect you've not talked to any one for some days?" he asked. "Scarcely any one. I suppose you are wondering at my being such an adaptable man?" "No, I am only wondering at your being too adaptable a man." "Because I am not offended at the rudeness of your questions? Is that it? But why take offence? As you asked, so I answered," he replied, with a surprising expression of simplicity. "You know, there's hardly anything I take interest in," he went on, as it were dreamily, "especially now, I've nothing to do.... You are quite at liberty to imagine though that I am making up to you with a motive, particularly as I told you I want to see your sister about something. But I'll confess frankly, I am very much bored. The last three days especially, so I am delighted to see you.... Don't be angry, Rodion Romanovitch, but you seem to be somehow awfully strange yourself. Say what you like, there's something wrong with you, and now, too... not this very minute, I mean, but now, generally.... Well, well, I won't, I won't, don't scowl! I am not such a bear, you know, as you think." Raskolnikov looked gloomily at him. "You are not a bear, perhaps, at all," he said. "I fancy indeed that you are a man of very good breeding, or at least know how on occasion to behave like one." "I am not particularly interested in any one's opinion," Svidrigailov answered, dryly and even with a shade of haughtiness, "and therefore why not be vulgar at times when vulgarity is such a convenient cloak for our climate... and especially if one has a natural propensity that way," he added, laughing again. "But I've heard you have many friends here. You are, as they say, 'not without connections.' What can you want with me, then, unless you've some special object?" "That's true that I have friends here," Svidrigailov admitted, not replying to the chief point. "I've met some already. I've been lounging about for the last three days, and I've seen them, or they've seen me. That's a matter of course. I am well dressed and reckoned not a poor man; the emancipation of the serfs hasn't affected me; my property consists chiefly of forests and water meadows. The revenue has not fallen off; but... I am not going to see them, I was sick of them long ago. I've been here three days and have called on no one.... What a town it is! How has it come into existence among us, tell me that? A town of officials and students of all sorts. Yes, there's a great deal I didn't notice when I was here eight years ago, kicking up my heels.... My only hope now is in anatomy, by Jove, it is!" "Anatomy?" "But as for these clubs, Dussauts, parades, or progress, indeed, may be- well, all that can go on without me," he went on, again without noticing the question. "Besides, who wants to be a card-sharper?" "Why, have you been a card-sharper then?" "How could I help being? There was a regular set of us, men of the best society, eight years ago; we had a fine time. And all men of

Raskolnikov saw clearly that this was a man with a firm purpose in his mind and able to keep it to himself. "I expect you've not talked to any one for some days?" he asked. "Scarcely any one. I suppose you are wondering at my being such an adaptable man?" "No, I am only wondering at your being too adaptable a man." "Because I am not offended at the rudeness of your questions? Is that it? But why take offence? As you asked, so I answered," he replied, with a surprising expression of simplicity. "You know, there's hardly anything I take interest in," he went on, as it were dreamily, "especially now, I've nothing to do.... You are quite at liberty to imagine though that I am making up to you with a motive, particularly as I told you I want to see your sister about something. But I'll confess frankly, I am very much bored. The last three days especially, so I am delighted to see you.... Don't be angry, Rodion Romanovitch, but you seem to be somehow awfully strange yourself. Say what you like, there's something wrong with you, and now, too... not this very minute, I mean, but now, generally.... Well, well, I won't, I won't, don't scowl! I am not such a bear, you know, as you think." Raskolnikov looked gloomily at him. "You are not a bear, perhaps, at all," he said. "I fancy indeed that you are a man of very good breeding, or at least know how on occasion to behave like one." "I am not particularly interested in any one's opinion," Svidrigailov answered, dryly and even with a shade of haughtiness, "and therefore why not be vulgar at times when vulgarity is such a convenient cloak for our climate... and especially if one has a natural propensity that way," he added, laughing again. "But I've heard you have many friends here. You are, as they say, 'not without connections.' What can you want with me, then, unless you've some special object?" "That's true that I have friends here," Svidrigailov admitted, not replying to the chief point. "I've met some already. I've been lounging about for the last three days, and I've seen them, or they've seen me. That's a matter of course. I am well dressed and reckoned not a poor man; the emancipation of the serfs hasn't affected me; my property consists chiefly of forests and water meadows. The revenue has not fallen off; but... I am not going to see them, I was sick of them long ago. I've been here three days and have called on no one.... What a town it is! How has it come into existence among us, tell me that? A town of officials and students of all sorts. Yes, there's a great deal I didn't notice when I was here eight years ago, kicking up my heels.... My only hope now is in anatomy, by Jove, it is!" "Anatomy?" "But as for these clubs, Dussauts, parades, or progress, indeed, may be- well, all that can go on without me," he went on, again without noticing the question. "Besides, who wants to be a card-sharper?" "Why, have you been a card-sharper then?" "How could I help being? There was a regular set of us, men of the best society, eight years ago; we had a fine time. And all men of,bob体育下载链接appRaskolnikov saw clearly that this was a man with a firm purpose in his mind and able to keep it to himself. "I expect you've not talked to any one for some days?" he asked. "Scarcely any one. I suppose you are wondering at my being such an adaptable man?" "No, I am only wondering at your being too adaptable a man." "Because I am not offended at the rudeness of your questions? Is that it? But why take offence? As you asked, so I answered," he replied, with a surprising expression of simplicity. "You know, there's hardly anything I take interest in," he went on, as it were dreamily, "especially now, I've nothing to do.... You are quite at liberty to imagine though that I am making up to you with a motive, particularly as I told you I want to see your sister about something. But I'll confess frankly, I am very much bored. The last three days especially, so I am delighted to see you.... Don't be angry, Rodion Romanovitch, but you seem to be somehow awfully strange yourself. Say what you like, there's something wrong with you, and now, too... not this very minute, I mean, but now, generally.... Well, well, I won't, I won't, don't scowl! I am not such a bear, you know, as you think." Raskolnikov looked gloomily at him. "You are not a bear, perhaps, at all," he said. "I fancy indeed that you are a man of very good breeding, or at least know how on occasion to behave like one." "I am not particularly interested in any one's opinion," Svidrigailov answered, dryly and even with a shade of haughtiness, "and therefore why not be vulgar at times when vulgarity is such a convenient cloak for our climate... and especially if one has a natural propensity that way," he added, laughing again. "But I've heard you have many friends here. You are, as they say, 'not without connections.' What can you want with me, then, unless you've some special object?" "That's true that I have friends here," Svidrigailov admitted, not replying to the chief point. "I've met some already. I've been lounging about for the last three days, and I've seen them, or they've seen me. That's a matter of course. I am well dressed and reckoned not a poor man; the emancipation of the serfs hasn't affected me; my property consists chiefly of forests and water meadows. The revenue has not fallen off; but... I am not going to see them, I was sick of them long ago. I've been here three days and have called on no one.... What a town it is! How has it come into existence among us, tell me that? A town of officials and students of all sorts. Yes, there's a great deal I didn't notice when I was here eight years ago, kicking up my heels.... My only hope now is in anatomy, by Jove, it is!" "Anatomy?" "But as for these clubs, Dussauts, parades, or progress, indeed, may be- well, all that can go on without me," he went on, again without noticing the question. "Besides, who wants to be a card-sharper?" "Why, have you been a card-sharper then?" "How could I help being? There was a regular set of us, men of the best society, eight years ago; we had a fine time. And all men of,Raskolnikov saw clearly that this was a man with a firm purpose in his mind and able to keep it to himself. "I expect you've not talked to any one for some days?" he asked. "Scarcely any one. I suppose you are wondering at my being such an adaptable man?" "No, I am only wondering at your being too adaptable a man." "Because I am not offended at the rudeness of your questions? Is that it? But why take offence? As you asked, so I answered," he replied, with a surprising expression of simplicity. "You know, there's hardly anything I take interest in," he went on, as it were dreamily, "especially now, I've nothing to do.... You are quite at liberty to imagine though that I am making up to you with a motive, particularly as I told you I want to see your sister about something. But I'll confess frankly, I am very much bored. The last three days especially, so I am delighted to see you.... Don't be angry, Rodion Romanovitch, but you seem to be somehow awfully strange yourself. Say what you like, there's something wrong with you, and now, too... not this very minute, I mean, but now, generally.... Well, well, I won't, I won't, don't scowl! I am not such a bear, you know, as you think." Raskolnikov looked gloomily at him. "You are not a bear, perhaps, at all," he said. "I fancy indeed that you are a man of very good breeding, or at least know how on occasion to behave like one." "I am not particularly interested in any one's opinion," Svidrigailov answered, dryly and even with a shade of haughtiness, "and therefore why not be vulgar at times when vulgarity is such a convenient cloak for our climate... and especially if one has a natural propensity that way," he added, laughing again. "But I've heard you have many friends here. You are, as they say, 'not without connections.' What can you want with me, then, unless you've some special object?" "That's true that I have friends here," Svidrigailov admitted, not replying to the chief point. "I've met some already. I've been lounging about for the last three days, and I've seen them, or they've seen me. That's a matter of course. I am well dressed and reckoned not a poor man; the emancipation of the serfs hasn't affected me; my property consists chiefly of forests and water meadows. The revenue has not fallen off; but... I am not going to see them, I was sick of them long ago. I've been here three days and have called on no one.... What a town it is! How has it come into existence among us, tell me that? A town of officials and students of all sorts. Yes, there's a great deal I didn't notice when I was here eight years ago, kicking up my heels.... My only hope now is in anatomy, by Jove, it is!" "Anatomy?" "But as for these clubs, Dussauts, parades, or progress, indeed, may be- well, all that can go on without me," he went on, again without noticing the question. "Besides, who wants to be a card-sharper?" "Why, have you been a card-sharper then?" "How could I help being? There was a regular set of us, men of the best society, eight years ago; we had a fine time. And all men ofbobapp体育官方下载

Raskolnikov saw clearly that this was a man with a firm purpose in his mind and able to keep it to himself. "I expect you've not talked to any one for some days?" he asked. "Scarcely any one. I suppose you are wondering at my being such an adaptable man?" "No, I am only wondering at your being too adaptable a man." "Because I am not offended at the rudeness of your questions? Is that it? But why take offence? As you asked, so I answered," he replied, with a surprising expression of simplicity. "You know, there's hardly anything I take interest in," he went on, as it were dreamily, "especially now, I've nothing to do.... You are quite at liberty to imagine though that I am making up to you with a motive, particularly as I told you I want to see your sister about something. But I'll confess frankly, I am very much bored. The last three days especially, so I am delighted to see you.... Don't be angry, Rodion Romanovitch, but you seem to be somehow awfully strange yourself. Say what you like, there's something wrong with you, and now, too... not this very minute, I mean, but now, generally.... Well, well, I won't, I won't, don't scowl! I am not such a bear, you know, as you think." Raskolnikov looked gloomily at him. "You are not a bear, perhaps, at all," he said. "I fancy indeed that you are a man of very good breeding, or at least know how on occasion to behave like one." "I am not particularly interested in any one's opinion," Svidrigailov answered, dryly and even with a shade of haughtiness, "and therefore why not be vulgar at times when vulgarity is such a convenient cloak for our climate... and especially if one has a natural propensity that way," he added, laughing again. "But I've heard you have many friends here. You are, as they say, 'not without connections.' What can you want with me, then, unless you've some special object?" "That's true that I have friends here," Svidrigailov admitted, not replying to the chief point. "I've met some already. I've been lounging about for the last three days, and I've seen them, or they've seen me. That's a matter of course. I am well dressed and reckoned not a poor man; the emancipation of the serfs hasn't affected me; my property consists chiefly of forests and water meadows. The revenue has not fallen off; but... I am not going to see them, I was sick of them long ago. I've been here three days and have called on no one.... What a town it is! How has it come into existence among us, tell me that? A town of officials and students of all sorts. Yes, there's a great deal I didn't notice when I was here eight years ago, kicking up my heels.... My only hope now is in anatomy, by Jove, it is!" "Anatomy?" "But as for these clubs, Dussauts, parades, or progress, indeed, may be- well, all that can go on without me," he went on, again without noticing the question. "Besides, who wants to be a card-sharper?" "Why, have you been a card-sharper then?" "How could I help being? There was a regular set of us, men of the best society, eight years ago; we had a fine time. And all men of,bob电竞体育平台Raskolnikov saw clearly that this was a man with a firm purpose in his mind and able to keep it to himself. "I expect you've not talked to any one for some days?" he asked. "Scarcely any one. I suppose you are wondering at my being such an adaptable man?" "No, I am only wondering at your being too adaptable a man." "Because I am not offended at the rudeness of your questions? Is that it? But why take offence? As you asked, so I answered," he replied, with a surprising expression of simplicity. "You know, there's hardly anything I take interest in," he went on, as it were dreamily, "especially now, I've nothing to do.... You are quite at liberty to imagine though that I am making up to you with a motive, particularly as I told you I want to see your sister about something. But I'll confess frankly, I am very much bored. The last three days especially, so I am delighted to see you.... Don't be angry, Rodion Romanovitch, but you seem to be somehow awfully strange yourself. Say what you like, there's something wrong with you, and now, too... not this very minute, I mean, but now, generally.... Well, well, I won't, I won't, don't scowl! I am not such a bear, you know, as you think." Raskolnikov looked gloomily at him. "You are not a bear, perhaps, at all," he said. "I fancy indeed that you are a man of very good breeding, or at least know how on occasion to behave like one." "I am not particularly interested in any one's opinion," Svidrigailov answered, dryly and even with a shade of haughtiness, "and therefore why not be vulgar at times when vulgarity is such a convenient cloak for our climate... and especially if one has a natural propensity that way," he added, laughing again. "But I've heard you have many friends here. You are, as they say, 'not without connections.' What can you want with me, then, unless you've some special object?" "That's true that I have friends here," Svidrigailov admitted, not replying to the chief point. "I've met some already. I've been lounging about for the last three days, and I've seen them, or they've seen me. That's a matter of course. I am well dressed and reckoned not a poor man; the emancipation of the serfs hasn't affected me; my property consists chiefly of forests and water meadows. The revenue has not fallen off; but... I am not going to see them, I was sick of them long ago. I've been here three days and have called on no one.... What a town it is! How has it come into existence among us, tell me that? A town of officials and students of all sorts. Yes, there's a great deal I didn't notice when I was here eight years ago, kicking up my heels.... My only hope now is in anatomy, by Jove, it is!" "Anatomy?" "But as for these clubs, Dussauts, parades, or progress, indeed, may be- well, all that can go on without me," he went on, again without noticing the question. "Besides, who wants to be a card-sharper?" "Why, have you been a card-sharper then?" "How could I help being? There was a regular set of us, men of the best society, eight years ago; we had a fine time. And all men of

Raskolnikov saw clearly that this was a man with a firm purpose in his mind and able to keep it to himself. "I expect you've not talked to any one for some days?" he asked. "Scarcely any one. I suppose you are wondering at my being such an adaptable man?" "No, I am only wondering at your being too adaptable a man." "Because I am not offended at the rudeness of your questions? Is that it? But why take offence? As you asked, so I answered," he replied, with a surprising expression of simplicity. "You know, there's hardly anything I take interest in," he went on, as it were dreamily, "especially now, I've nothing to do.... You are quite at liberty to imagine though that I am making up to you with a motive, particularly as I told you I want to see your sister about something. But I'll confess frankly, I am very much bored. The last three days especially, so I am delighted to see you.... Don't be angry, Rodion Romanovitch, but you seem to be somehow awfully strange yourself. Say what you like, there's something wrong with you, and now, too... not this very minute, I mean, but now, generally.... Well, well, I won't, I won't, don't scowl! I am not such a bear, you know, as you think." Raskolnikov looked gloomily at him. "You are not a bear, perhaps, at all," he said. "I fancy indeed that you are a man of very good breeding, or at least know how on occasion to behave like one." "I am not particularly interested in any one's opinion," Svidrigailov answered, dryly and even with a shade of haughtiness, "and therefore why not be vulgar at times when vulgarity is such a convenient cloak for our climate... and especially if one has a natural propensity that way," he added, laughing again. "But I've heard you have many friends here. You are, as they say, 'not without connections.' What can you want with me, then, unless you've some special object?" "That's true that I have friends here," Svidrigailov admitted, not replying to the chief point. "I've met some already. I've been lounging about for the last three days, and I've seen them, or they've seen me. That's a matter of course. I am well dressed and reckoned not a poor man; the emancipation of the serfs hasn't affected me; my property consists chiefly of forests and water meadows. The revenue has not fallen off; but... I am not going to see them, I was sick of them long ago. I've been here three days and have called on no one.... What a town it is! How has it come into existence among us, tell me that? A town of officials and students of all sorts. Yes, there's a great deal I didn't notice when I was here eight years ago, kicking up my heels.... My only hope now is in anatomy, by Jove, it is!" "Anatomy?" "But as for these clubs, Dussauts, parades, or progress, indeed, may be- well, all that can go on without me," he went on, again without noticing the question. "Besides, who wants to be a card-sharper?" "Why, have you been a card-sharper then?" "How could I help being? There was a regular set of us, men of the best society, eight years ago; we had a fine time. And all men of,bob双赢棋牌是真的吗,bobo体育app下载Raskolnikov saw clearly that this was a man with a firm purpose in his mind and able to keep it to himself. "I expect you've not talked to any one for some days?" he asked. "Scarcely any one. I suppose you are wondering at my being such an adaptable man?" "No, I am only wondering at your being too adaptable a man." "Because I am not offended at the rudeness of your questions? Is that it? But why take offence? As you asked, so I answered," he replied, with a surprising expression of simplicity. "You know, there's hardly anything I take interest in," he went on, as it were dreamily, "especially now, I've nothing to do.... You are quite at liberty to imagine though that I am making up to you with a motive, particularly as I told you I want to see your sister about something. But I'll confess frankly, I am very much bored. The last three days especially, so I am delighted to see you.... Don't be angry, Rodion Romanovitch, but you seem to be somehow awfully strange yourself. Say what you like, there's something wrong with you, and now, too... not this very minute, I mean, but now, generally.... Well, well, I won't, I won't, don't scowl! I am not such a bear, you know, as you think." Raskolnikov looked gloomily at him. "You are not a bear, perhaps, at all," he said. "I fancy indeed that you are a man of very good breeding, or at least know how on occasion to behave like one." "I am not particularly interested in any one's opinion," Svidrigailov answered, dryly and even with a shade of haughtiness, "and therefore why not be vulgar at times when vulgarity is such a convenient cloak for our climate... and especially if one has a natural propensity that way," he added, laughing again. "But I've heard you have many friends here. You are, as they say, 'not without connections.' What can you want with me, then, unless you've some special object?" "That's true that I have friends here," Svidrigailov admitted, not replying to the chief point. "I've met some already. I've been lounging about for the last three days, and I've seen them, or they've seen me. That's a matter of course. I am well dressed and reckoned not a poor man; the emancipation of the serfs hasn't affected me; my property consists chiefly of forests and water meadows. The revenue has not fallen off; but... I am not going to see them, I was sick of them long ago. I've been here three days and have called on no one.... What a town it is! How has it come into existence among us, tell me that? A town of officials and students of all sorts. Yes, there's a great deal I didn't notice when I was here eight years ago, kicking up my heels.... My only hope now is in anatomy, by Jove, it is!" "Anatomy?" "But as for these clubs, Dussauts, parades, or progress, indeed, may be- well, all that can go on without me," he went on, again without noticing the question. "Besides, who wants to be a card-sharper?" "Why, have you been a card-sharper then?" "How could I help being? There was a regular set of us, men of the best society, eight years ago; we had a fine time. And all men of

Raskolnikov saw clearly that this was a man with a firm purpose in his mind and able to keep it to himself. "I expect you've not talked to any one for some days?" he asked. "Scarcely any one. I suppose you are wondering at my being such an adaptable man?" "No, I am only wondering at your being too adaptable a man." "Because I am not offended at the rudeness of your questions? Is that it? But why take offence? As you asked, so I answered," he replied, with a surprising expression of simplicity. "You know, there's hardly anything I take interest in," he went on, as it were dreamily, "especially now, I've nothing to do.... You are quite at liberty to imagine though that I am making up to you with a motive, particularly as I told you I want to see your sister about something. But I'll confess frankly, I am very much bored. The last three days especially, so I am delighted to see you.... Don't be angry, Rodion Romanovitch, but you seem to be somehow awfully strange yourself. Say what you like, there's something wrong with you, and now, too... not this very minute, I mean, but now, generally.... Well, well, I won't, I won't, don't scowl! I am not such a bear, you know, as you think." Raskolnikov looked gloomily at him. "You are not a bear, perhaps, at all," he said. "I fancy indeed that you are a man of very good breeding, or at least know how on occasion to behave like one." "I am not particularly interested in any one's opinion," Svidrigailov answered, dryly and even with a shade of haughtiness, "and therefore why not be vulgar at times when vulgarity is such a convenient cloak for our climate... and especially if one has a natural propensity that way," he added, laughing again. "But I've heard you have many friends here. You are, as they say, 'not without connections.' What can you want with me, then, unless you've some special object?" "That's true that I have friends here," Svidrigailov admitted, not replying to the chief point. "I've met some already. I've been lounging about for the last three days, and I've seen them, or they've seen me. That's a matter of course. I am well dressed and reckoned not a poor man; the emancipation of the serfs hasn't affected me; my property consists chiefly of forests and water meadows. The revenue has not fallen off; but... I am not going to see them, I was sick of them long ago. I've been here three days and have called on no one.... What a town it is! How has it come into existence among us, tell me that? A town of officials and students of all sorts. Yes, there's a great deal I didn't notice when I was here eight years ago, kicking up my heels.... My only hope now is in anatomy, by Jove, it is!" "Anatomy?" "But as for these clubs, Dussauts, parades, or progress, indeed, may be- well, all that can go on without me," he went on, again without noticing the question. "Besides, who wants to be a card-sharper?" "Why, have you been a card-sharper then?" "How could I help being? There was a regular set of us, men of the best society, eight years ago; we had a fine time. And all men of,bob170 appRaskolnikov saw clearly that this was a man with a firm purpose in his mind and able to keep it to himself. "I expect you've not talked to any one for some days?" he asked. "Scarcely any one. I suppose you are wondering at my being such an adaptable man?" "No, I am only wondering at your being too adaptable a man." "Because I am not offended at the rudeness of your questions? Is that it? But why take offence? As you asked, so I answered," he replied, with a surprising expression of simplicity. "You know, there's hardly anything I take interest in," he went on, as it were dreamily, "especially now, I've nothing to do.... You are quite at liberty to imagine though that I am making up to you with a motive, particularly as I told you I want to see your sister about something. But I'll confess frankly, I am very much bored. The last three days especially, so I am delighted to see you.... Don't be angry, Rodion Romanovitch, but you seem to be somehow awfully strange yourself. Say what you like, there's something wrong with you, and now, too... not this very minute, I mean, but now, generally.... Well, well, I won't, I won't, don't scowl! I am not such a bear, you know, as you think." Raskolnikov looked gloomily at him. "You are not a bear, perhaps, at all," he said. "I fancy indeed that you are a man of very good breeding, or at least know how on occasion to behave like one." "I am not particularly interested in any one's opinion," Svidrigailov answered, dryly and even with a shade of haughtiness, "and therefore why not be vulgar at times when vulgarity is such a convenient cloak for our climate... and especially if one has a natural propensity that way," he added, laughing again. "But I've heard you have many friends here. You are, as they say, 'not without connections.' What can you want with me, then, unless you've some special object?" "That's true that I have friends here," Svidrigailov admitted, not replying to the chief point. "I've met some already. I've been lounging about for the last three days, and I've seen them, or they've seen me. That's a matter of course. I am well dressed and reckoned not a poor man; the emancipation of the serfs hasn't affected me; my property consists chiefly of forests and water meadows. The revenue has not fallen off; but... I am not going to see them, I was sick of them long ago. I've been here three days and have called on no one.... What a town it is! How has it come into existence among us, tell me that? A town of officials and students of all sorts. Yes, there's a great deal I didn't notice when I was here eight years ago, kicking up my heels.... My only hope now is in anatomy, by Jove, it is!" "Anatomy?" "But as for these clubs, Dussauts, parades, or progress, indeed, may be- well, all that can go on without me," he went on, again without noticing the question. "Besides, who wants to be a card-sharper?" "Why, have you been a card-sharper then?" "How could I help being? There was a regular set of us, men of the best society, eight years ago; we had a fine time. And all men ofbob棋牌输,Raskolnikov saw clearly that this was a man with a firm purpose in his mind and able to keep it to himself. "I expect you've not talked to any one for some days?" he asked. "Scarcely any one. I suppose you are wondering at my being such an adaptable man?" "No, I am only wondering at your being too adaptable a man." "Because I am not offended at the rudeness of your questions? Is that it? But why take offence? As you asked, so I answered," he replied, with a surprising expression of simplicity. "You know, there's hardly anything I take interest in," he went on, as it were dreamily, "especially now, I've nothing to do.... You are quite at liberty to imagine though that I am making up to you with a motive, particularly as I told you I want to see your sister about something. But I'll confess frankly, I am very much bored. The last three days especially, so I am delighted to see you.... Don't be angry, Rodion Romanovitch, but you seem to be somehow awfully strange yourself. Say what you like, there's something wrong with you, and now, too... not this very minute, I mean, but now, generally.... Well, well, I won't, I won't, don't scowl! I am not such a bear, you know, as you think." Raskolnikov looked gloomily at him. "You are not a bear, perhaps, at all," he said. "I fancy indeed that you are a man of very good breeding, or at least know how on occasion to behave like one." "I am not particularly interested in any one's opinion," Svidrigailov answered, dryly and even with a shade of haughtiness, "and therefore why not be vulgar at times when vulgarity is such a convenient cloak for our climate... and especially if one has a natural propensity that way," he added, laughing again. "But I've heard you have many friends here. You are, as they say, 'not without connections.' What can you want with me, then, unless you've some special object?" "That's true that I have friends here," Svidrigailov admitted, not replying to the chief point. "I've met some already. I've been lounging about for the last three days, and I've seen them, or they've seen me. That's a matter of course. I am well dressed and reckoned not a poor man; the emancipation of the serfs hasn't affected me; my property consists chiefly of forests and water meadows. The revenue has not fallen off; but... I am not going to see them, I was sick of them long ago. I've been here three days and have called on no one.... What a town it is! How has it come into existence among us, tell me that? A town of officials and students of all sorts. Yes, there's a great deal I didn't notice when I was here eight years ago, kicking up my heels.... My only hope now is in anatomy, by Jove, it is!" "Anatomy?" "But as for these clubs, Dussauts, parades, or progress, indeed, may be- well, all that can go on without me," he went on, again without noticing the question. "Besides, who wants to be a card-sharper?" "Why, have you been a card-sharper then?" "How could I help being? There was a regular set of us, men of the best society, eight years ago; we had a fine time. And all men of

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